Director of Training Manual

Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs

Prepared for CCPTP Executive Board by Donald R. Atkinson (1987)

Other members of that Executive Board were: Elizabeth Mtmaier, Janice Birk, Kathleen Davis, Franz Epting, Lenore Harmon, Jarnes Lichtenberg, Sharon Robinson

This manual was updated in 1994 by Michele C. Boyer, and again in 1999 by Nancy S. Elman

Members of the 1998-1999 Executive Board are: Bob McPherson, Chair, Willis Bartlett, Michael Brown, Chuck Claiborn, Collie Conoley, Nancy Elman, Nadya Fouad, Lisa Larson, Jim Lichtenberg, Nancy Murdock (past Chair)

CONTENTS

Preface
Section 1. INTERNAL AFFAIRS

1.1 Administrative Role

1.1.1 Department
1.1.2 University
1.1.3 Budget
1.1.4 Training Clinic

1.2 Leadership Role

1.2.1 Curriculum
1.2.2 Faculty
1.2.3 Students
1.2.4 Research

Section 2. LIAISON WITH PROFESSIONAL AGENCIES

2.1 APA
2.1.1 Accreditation
2.1.2 Division 17
2.2 CCPTP
2.3 APPIC
2.4 State Licensing Boards
2.5 Federal Agencies
2.6 COGDOP

Section 3. LIAISON WITH INTERNSHIP SITES

3.1 Placement of Interns
3.2 Evaluation of Interns

Section 4. OBTAINING RESOURCES

4.1 Student Support

4.1.1 Campus Resources
4.1.2 Extramural Resources

4.2 Teaching Support

4.2.1 Intramural Support
4.2.2 Extramural Support

4.3 Research Support

4.3.1 Intramural Support
4.3.2 Extramural Support

Preface

This manual was prepared by the Executive Board of the Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs (CCPTP) to assist Directors of Graduate Training (DOT) in counseling psychology programs. The manual was designed with a specific aim of serving as a resource for DOTs, particularly new DOTs. Basically, the DOT serves two roles, as an administrator of the doctoral program in counseling psychology within some academic unit on the home campus and as a liaison with other agencies outside the program. In addition to describing these two roles, the manual identifies a number of resources in the areas of student support, teaching, and research that may be helpful to the new (and experienced) DOT.

Section 1. INTERNAL AFFAIRS

1.1 Administrative Role
The responsibilities of being a Director of Graduate Training (DOT) vary from campus to campus depending on the structure within which the Counseling Psychology Program is housed. The DOT of a program housed within a Department of Psychology (or whatever the departmental title may be) typically works under a department chair and may have limited administrative responsibilities. In this case the DOT serves primarily as a leader within the program and as a liaison with outside agencies for the program. On the other hand, the DOT of a Department of Counseling Psychology may also serve as Chair of the Department with full responsibility for budgetary, resource allocation, curricular, and other decisions. Depending on the combination of responsibilities involved, some DOTs receive release time and/or a stipend for their administrative responsibilities. A recent conversation on this topic is archived on the CCPTP Web Page, described below.

1.1.1 Department
Particularly for a new DOT, it is helpful to have a written job description delineating the DOTs administrative responsibilities. Typically these will include assigning course loads to Counseling Psychology faculty, scheduling courses to be offered each year, evaluation of other Counseling Psychology faculty, obtaining space for the program (students, offices, classrooms, clinics), coordinating the predoctoral internship, assigning students to advisors or committees, and many other administrative tasks depending on the program and the administrative structure involved. The relationship of the DOT to the Counseling Psychology faculty should also be clearly stated by the Department Chair and the DOT.

1.1.2 University
Although the DOT may occasionally deal directly with the Dean or Provost of the College, most administrative interactions are with the Department Chair. Interactions with Deans and higher level administrators involve coordination of the interviews with site-visitors for APA-accredited programs. Occasionally, the DOT will be called upon to represent the interests of the Counseling Psychology Program to the central administration. This is particularly true for programs housed in departments other than the Psychology Department.

1.1.3 Budget
Even though the responsibility for the budget may lie with the Department Chair and not the DOT, the DOT should become as familiar as possible with budget lines and the resources being allocated to the Counseling Psychology Program. Being aware of such bureaucratic details as deadlines for budget line requests and budget organization can significantly enhance the chances that the Counseling Psychology Program will get its fair share of resources.

Another major aspect of the budget is the awarding of financial support (fellowships, fee waivers, teaching and research assistantships, etc.) to graduate students. Generally, this activity will involve the Counseling Psychology faculty, but someone (preferably the DOT) has to coordinate the process. if there is a Director of Graduate Studies, the awarding of financial support may be coordinated with that person. Preferably, the decisions regarding who gets financial support remain in the hands of the DOT and the counseling faculty.

1.1.4 Training Clinic
In those programs that have a training clinic associated with them, one of the major responsibilities of the DOT is coordinating the program with the clinic. If there is a training clinic, there typically is a Clinic Director. An organizational chart should clearly specify the relationship between the Clinic Director, the DOT, the Department Chair and the Dean. It should be clear who is responsible for the Clinic budget, assignment of space, assignment of staff, hiring and firing of clerical and assistantship staff, legal responsibility for Clinic activities, and so on

1.2 Leadership Role
In general, the DOT is responsible for the smooth running and overall success of the Counseling Psychology Program. The DOT cannot do this entirely on his/her own, however, and should enlist the assistance of other faculty in running the Program for reasons related both to mental health and to democratic ideals.

1.2.1 Curriculum
The DOT usually works with the Counseling Psychology faculty to develop courses for the program that are consonant with the program's specific training model for counseling psychology. APA advocates the inclusion of scientific and professional ethics and standards, research design and methodology, statistics, psychological measurement, history and systems of psychology, biological bases of behavior, cognitive-affective bases of behavior, social bases of behavior, individual behavior, cultural and individual differences, and courses related to specialty training in a professional psychology curriculum. Partly in response to the changes in the APA Accreditation Guidelines and Principles, Division 17 and CCPTP have developed and published a Model Training Program in Counseling Psychology which can be found in the July 1998 Counseling Psychologist (Murdoch, Alcorn, Heesacker & Stoltenberg, 1998).

On most campuses department faculty and appropriate university committees will also be involved in gaining course approval. It is important that the faculty be involved in a dynamic process of continuing self-study and modification of the curriculum. The DOT is advised to seek input from Counseling Psychology, as well as non-counseling psychology faculty, and from Counseling Psychology students in this process. In order to assist with the ongoing. process of self study and modification of program and curriculum, some programs pay outside consultants to come in and evaluate their programs in order to make appropriate suggestions for improvement and modification to the faculty and students.

In addition, the DOT usually works with the counseling faculty to enhance learning experiences in the program by bringing in lecturers for colloquia, workshops, and the teaching of additional courses. This often involves competition with other programs to secure department funds for this purpose. The DOT usually encourages the participation of students at various conferences and conventions and also tries to obtain financial support for attendance at these functions.

1.2.2 Faculty
The DOT should be involved in the recruitment of new Counseling Psychology faculty by directly supervising the process, serving on relevant search committees, or at least by making recommendations to the Department Chair in connection with candidates proposed for Counseling Psychology positions. Regardless of the DOT's formal role, he or she should seek faculty appointments of individuals who have a Counseling Psychology identification (as evidenced by their research and writing, membership in APA Division 17, eligibility for licensing, et.). The DOT may play a key role in evaluating the performance of the faculty and may consult with the Department Chair about salary raises, promotions, sabbatical leaves, recommendations for tenure, and other matters pertaining to the counseling psychology faculty.

The DOT generally has the responsibility for assigning faculty to teach required Counseling Psychology courses, to oversee the supervisory activities of counseling psychology faculty, and to coordinate the activities of any adjunct counseling psychology faculty. It is important that teaching loads be reasonable and in line with teaching loads across campus, and that faculty members are given credit for work that they do in supervising practice and research. The DOT chairs the Counseling Psychology faculty meetings; most DOTs find that regularly scheduled meetings are essential to the smooth operation of the program.

The DOT is the principal representative of the views of the Counseling Psychology faculty to the rest of the Department, the School in which the program is housed. and the campus in general.

1.2.3 Students
It is important that accurate descriptive information on the Counseling Psychology Program be contained in printed material that is available to applicants. The descriptive material should provide an accurate picture of the Program goals, theoretical orientation and major missions of the Program, and training model adhered to by the Program. This information should also include the requirements of the Program, the experiences that are available to students, and the resources available to students. Applicants should be informed of minimum acceptance criteria, the proportion of recent applicants that have gained admission to the Program, and demographic characteristics of students in the program. The DOT plays a central role in designing, organizing, and updating these materials. Specific information that should be disseminated to students is described in the APA Accreditation Guidelines, and was further elaborated at the 1997 "Supply and Demand" conference on psychology training. A "truth in advertising" resolution regarding materials recommended to be disseminated by Programs was approved in 1998 by the Board and is available on the CCPTP Website. This information minimally includes for the last academic year:

1. Admissions data: number of applicants and number admitted
2. Program faculty to student ratio
3. Predoctoral internship: internship applicants and placements; accreditation and funding status of placements
4. Number of students ABD
5. Number of students ABI
6. Initial job placements of graduates

Selection of prospective graduate students for the Counseling Psychology Program is one of the most important program activities. In many programs it is the DOT who has the responsibility for developing materials aimed at attracting students, developing selection criteria, reviewing applicants, directing the final selection process, securing student funding, evaluating the students in their fieldwork placements and providing unambiguous feedback to students about their progress toward attaining counseling skills.

In order to do this, the DOT or other faculty (e.g., coordinator of practice training) must maintain close contact with field supervisors. The DOT is also responsible in many programs for monitoring the non-practicum clinical experience of students enrolled in the program. Some programs have a formal policy against unsupervised clinical experience; students who want to obtain clinical experience beyond that required through their practicum and or internships must do so in a setting approved by the counseling psychology program. Of course, policies such as this should be adequately explained in the program brochure so students are informed prior to entering the program.

It is important to consider "due process" factors in the evaluation process for graduate students and to have an established grievance procedure. At a minimum, the DOT should become familiar with student due process procedures established by the campus administration. Some universities provide a campus ombudsman to assist students with grievance procedures. In some cases the Counseling Psychology Program will want to supplement the campus due process policy to ensure that Counseling Psychology students are informed of the program's objectives and criteria, and are afforded full rights as students. The DOT should make sure that students are informed of their rights.

The DOT is one of the primary sources of information about the program. Thus, he/she is placed in the continuing role of advisor to graduate students with regard to requirements, sources of support, practicum and internship possibilities, and career goals. One way that many DOTs have facilitated this informational role is through the development of a student handbook.

1.2.4 Research
In addition to fulfilling a leadership role with respect to curriculum, faculty, and students, the DOT provides leadership for counseling psychology research. The DOT can serve as a model faculty researcher, encourage the exchange of research ideas through periodic colloquia, and support student and faculty research by promoting application to appropriate funding sources.

1.2.5 External Practicum Sites
In those programs that have training sites outside of the program i.e., other university agencies, community agencies and private practice agencies, the DOT works with such agencies to: 1) establish the type of clinical experiences to be provided; 2) insure appropriate supervision by qualified persons for an adequate period of time; and 3) develop a training contract with the agency which includes the dates student will be at the site, type of training the student will receive, stipend (making sure the student is not paid on a fee for service basis), professional liability coverage, how and when the student's work will be evaluated, and circumstances for termination of contract. In some programs the DOT develops strategies for obtaining external placements by establishing a clinical advisory team comprised of local practitioners and program faculty to discuss training issues and their resolution. This provides an excellent forum to discuss program and site training needs and also obtain feedback on quality of training from those sites where students are placed.

Section 2. LIAISONS WITH PROFESSIONAL AGENCIES

The DOT serves as the primary liaison between the Counseling Psychology Program and a number of professional agencies in psychology. This means the DOT receives a great deal of mail, if nothing else. A few of these agencies are described in the following sections; others are described in Appendix A.

2.1 American Psychological Association
The APA typically directs correspondence relevant to accredited and non-accredited Counseling Psychology programs to the DOT. This includes items of information, requests for feedback on proposed APA policy matters, solicitation of lobbying efforts for APA related legislation, etc. For accredited programs, correspondence is received from APA almost weekly. Information about APA functions can be located at their website: www.apa.org.

2.1.1 Accreditation
The decision of whether or not to seek APA accreditation is a complicated process that must begin with faculty and student soul searching. A first step in the pursuit of APA accreditation is to obtain the application materials and the Accreditation materials from the APA Accreditation Office. The self-study outlined in those materials facilitates the process of assessing which elements of the program, if any, must be changed in order to meet the guidelines and principles in each domain. Program objectives and goals, outcome assessment, practicum and internship requirements, and other areas will need to be reviewed to determine whether they meet APA standards. Faculty identification as professional psychologists is another key factor in obtaining APA accreditation.

It is imperative that the program seek the advice of consultants in this process. Most programs consult with the APA accreditation staff, the DOTs of accredited programs, and colleagues known to have experience as site visitors. APA all but requires that each program seeking accreditation bring in a consultant prior to filing a formal application. APA will furnish a list of possible consultants upon request. The Accreditation Office is extremely helpful throughout the application process.

Once the Accreditation Office has approved a site visit to the program, the DOT must organize for the visit. The Accreditation Office will provide lists from which to select three site visitors. It helps to seek advice from knowledgeable colleagues before selecting the site visitors. It is up to the DOT to contact the three reviewers and to schedule the dates of the visit. Pre-site-visit organization goes a long way toward ensuring a smooth site visit. This includes: preparing the administration for the visit, alerting the custodial staff, preparing the faculty and students, alerting practicum supervisors. and organizing the Program's records (site visitors frequently request course outlines, student transcripts, practicum evaluation forms, etc.).

After having earned APA accreditation, the Program (read the DOT) will be required to complete an annual update. The Program will be scheduled for a renewal site visit within the next three to seven years. It is helpful for the DOT to continuously accumulate information to use for ongoing outcome assessment and in these reports and later site visits. Such information includes: titles, dates, and advisors of dissertations; data about incoming graduate students; attrition data; records of practicum and internship locations and supervisors; employment and licensing examination scores of program graduates; course outlines; and vitae of faculty and practicum supervisors. Between site visits, it is also helpful to engage in periodic self-study (with resultant changes), perhaps through faculty retreats or through evaluations of the program provided by current students or program graduates.

2.1.2 Division 17
Division 17 is the Division of Counseling Psychology in the American Psychological Association. The Division 17 homepage address is: http://www.div17.org/. Links to other relevant sites for Counseling Psychology are found there.

Division 17 meets annually for a business meeting at the National Convention of the APA. The Division officers are elected by the general membership and consist of a President, President-Elect, Past President, Secretary, Treasurer, Representatives to the Council of the APA (Division Representatives) in the number provided by the Bylaws of the APA, and four Vice Presidents (Scientific Affairs; Education and Training; Professional Practice; and Diversity and Public Interest). In addition, Division 17 has a number of standing committees for Maintenance (Awards, Fellowship, Membership, Nominations), Publications & Programs (Newsletter, The Counseling Psychologist, APA Program Committee, Continuing Education and Regional Conferences), and The Student Affiliate Group. Divisional structure also provides for the formation of Sections, Special Interest Groups (SIGs), and Special Task Groups (STGs) which allow members with common interests to organize and meet. The Vice President for Education is an especially important liaison to CCPTP; Rod Goodyear currently holds that post.

Faculty in Counseling Psychology Programs can become members of Division 17 even though they are not graduates of, or associated with, an accredited program. To become a member of Division 17, the applicant must be a member of APA for one year and obtain the endorsement of two members of the Division. Also, Counseling Psychology students can become student affiliates of APA and enjoy membership rates on APA journals and the convention Further, Counseling Psychology students are encouraged to join the Division 17 SAG (Student Affiliate Group), which includes a subscription to The Counseling Psychologist.

2.2 Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs (CCPTP)
The purpose of the CCPTP is to foster the training of Counseling Psychologists. The CCPTP does this most directly by representing the interests of Counseling Psychology training programs to the APA and other agencies whose functions are relevant to the profession. In addition, the Council disseminates information relevant to Counseling Psychology (such as this manual) and participates in the formulation of policies concerning education in Counseling Psychology. CCPTP's website: http://wwwbef.usc.edu/-goodyea/ccptpman.htm. Among the valuable resources on the website is an archive of a number of dialogues, informal surveys and issues that have been shared among the DOT's over the last few years.

Any doctoral level training program in Counseling Psychology is eligible for Council membership. These programs may or may not be APA approved, but they must define themselves as counseling psychology training programs and have a required curriculum largely consistent with APA requirements. In addition, two4hirds of the Council's Executive Board must support their acceptance, and the program must pay a membership fee. Programs not yet ready for institutional membership may receive CCPTP mailings by becoming "Institutional Information" members. Individual memberships for interested persons are also invited (dues are currently $15.00 per year).

The Executive Board of the Council serves as the governing body of CCPTP and meets twice each year, once at the APA National Convention in late August and once for a mid-winter meeting in February or March. The meeting is part of the National Conference for Directors of Training of Counseling Psychology Training Programs, begun in 1993. The 2000 mid-winter meeting will be held at the Tradewinds in Miami St. Petersburg, Florida, January 28-30. Program information and registration is posted on the CCPTP website.

The Executive Board consists of nine elected members from the Council membership; three new Board members are elected each year for three-year terms. The Board selects a Chairperson, Secretary, Treasurer, and Survey Coordinator from among its membership.

One important function of the CCPTP is the annual survey it conducts. All member doctoral programs in Counseling Psychology are sent questionnaires, the results of which are mailed to Programs and are available on the CCPTP Website. Most DOTs find this survey useful for comparison of their program to the national data for all counseling psychology programs.

CCPTP also grants annually (since 1997) an Outstanding Graduate Student Award. Students are nominated by Program faculty and DOTs. The $500 award was twice underwritten by Brooksl Cole Publishers and in 1999 is underwritten by an anonymous donor. A committee of Board and other CCPTP members selects the winner, who is announced at the Annual Meeting in August.

In order to enhance communication among Directors of Graduate Training in counseling psychology, the Executive Board authorized the creation (Summer 1993) of an electronic discussion list (bulletin board) for CCPTP members to engage in conversations about issues related to training. A number of listserv discussions of training issues have been archived and is available by topic. Training directors associated with institutional and informational membership, and individual members will be added to the listserv automatically when they pay their membership dues. The list is confidential and is for the use of CCPTP members only. For programs with co-directors of training, please contact the current President for assistance.

2.3 Association of Psychology Post Doctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC)
The Association of Psychology Post Doctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) is the organization to which most internships belong. APPIC' 5 website is: www.appic.org. This website is an essential resource for material on the new Matching process adopted in 1998, the APPIC standard application form, the clearing house and other information. Students preparing for the internship will also need to be familiar with the website. Additional listservs about internship and APPIC functioning are also accessible through the website.

APPIC publishes a Directory of internship and postdoctoral training settings that is updated yearly. The Directory provides data on internship settings such as the number of interns or postdoctoral trainees they take, type of client they serve, whether the setting is APA-accredited or not, and whom to contact for an application. APPIC policies regarding guidelines for making application, negotiating offers (between student and internship agencies), and the internship training itself are also contained in the Directory.

This is an indispensable guide for both doctoral students and the DOT. Many Counseling Psychology Programs become members of APPIC in order to receive the Directory and to have a say in APPIC policy. APPIC also provides a "clearinghouse" that status of the program. Second, the performance of program graduates on the licensing exam should periodically be obtained from the licensing board. (These scores are also available from ASPPB, the Association of State Psychology Boards). Third, the DOT should offer comments to the licensing board on proposed changes in the board's policy or procedure. Fourth, the DOT, on behalf of the program, should nominate members for the licensing board.

With respect to other State licensing boards, the DOT is frequently requested to complete forms or write letters of recommendation about graduates. Graduates of non-APA accredited Counseling Psychology programs or of programs not designated specifically as Counseling Psychology (e.g., Counseling and Human Development), sometimes encounter difficulty in being licensed by state licensing boards. When this is due to uncertainty of the licensing board as to whether the program is a doctoral program in psychology, the program may expedite the review process. The DOT can provide the licensing board with prior information regarding the content, faculty, administrative structure and psychology content of the program. A program may wish to provide such information only to the licensing board in its home state, to licensing boards in those states where graduates usually apply for licensure, or to licensing boards in all states and provinces.

Based on the experience of some Council members who have served on state licensing boards, the following types of program information are ones which boards may find helpful:

1. Program title as listed in official university publications. If the program title is something other than Counseling Psychology or Psychology, some explanation should be provided regarding the rationale for the title.
2. Objectives of the program. The objectives should clearly show that the program intends to train psychologists, rather than counselors, student personnel workers, or counselor educators, for example.
3. Administrative structure.
4. Department in which the program is housed.
5. Faculty status and title of program director.
6. Teaching faculty. Teaching faculty within the program should be designated.

Information needed for each person:
1. Name
2. Degree
3. Academic Rank
4. Licensing Status
5. ABPP Status
6. APA Status (member, fellow) including divisional membership.
7. A complete outline of the curriculum.
8. Cross referencing. Information should be provided concerning cross referencing of courses in official University catalogs, e.g., Counseling Theories may be cross referenced as an Education course and a Psychology course.
9. Catalog descriptions should be provided for courses which are not designated as Psychology in their title or numeric listing, but which are part of the Counseling Psychology curriculum. Include also the names of the instructor(s) teaching the course(s) and the identifying information noted above in item 4.
10. Courses which meet the psychology generic core requirements should be identified.
11. Practicum and internship requirements should be described.
12. Copies of official university documents which describe the program should be included.
13. Information should be updated on a yearly basis.

The primary objective of this information is to document that the program trains psychologists, or if the program is not officially designated as a psychology program, that it is substantially equivalent. Although this information does not ensure a licensing board's approval of an applicant for licensure, it provides the board with a basis for making an informed decision. Submitting complete documentation beforehand may also permit the program to represent itself accurately to prospective students. if a program claims to provide doctoral training in psychology, it is the responsibility of the faculty to clarify its status with respect to relevant state licensing boards.

Students should be informed about licensing requirements for both master's and doctoral degree graduates. The DOT should be aware of the licensure status of all faculty, practicum supervisors, internship supervisors, and should encourage licensure of these personnel in accordance with the appropriate state laws.

2.6 Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology (COGDOP)
APA-accredited Counseling Psychology Programs housed in departments other than Psychology are often not aware that they are eligible for membership in COGDOP. The objectives of COGDOP are to: (1) promote the development of psychology; and (2) represent the interests of graduate departments of psychology to APA. The name of the current Chair of the COGDOP Executive Board can be obtained from APA. New DOTs may want to consult experienced DOTs regarding the benefits of joining COGDOP before becoming members.

Section 3. LIAISON WITH INTERNSHIP SITES

3.1 Placement of Interns
The DOT is responsible for coordinating the placement of students in predoctoral internships. As stated earlier, the APPIC Directory is an indispensable resource for this purpose. Coordination frequently involves meeting with students to discuss the number and nature of internships to which they are making application, discussing how to arrange and handle interviews (telephone and on-site) with internship staff, how to prepare vitae and applications, soliciting letters of recommendation from faculty and practicum staff, preparing for the matching process, dealing with pressures by internship representatives to accept offers and/or rank order preferences, what to do if no internship offers are forthcoming (e.g., utilize APPIC clearinghouse), what one is to expect from an internship, and what to do when more than one student wishes to apply to an internship which restricts the number of applicants or interns from a training program.

3.2 Evaluation
The DOT is also responsible for coordinating the evaluation of pre-doctoral interns for the program. This typically involves contacting the student's internship supervisor with a request for feedback near the end of the academic quarter/semester. Evaluation is facilitated if the DOT has developed a form for written feedback that can be completed by the supervisor, although some internship agencies prefer to provide their own evaluation form.

Section 4. OBTAINIING RESOURCES

An important function of the DOT is to provide students and faculty with information about the resources available to them. A written record of these resources helps to ensure that as many people as possible who need resources will get them.

4.1 Student Support
4.1.1 Campus Resources
The DOT should compile a list of campus and local resources available for student support. These typically include teaching assistantships (don't forget departments other than the one in which your program is housed), research assistantships, graduate assistantships, graduate fellowships, financial aid loans, work study monies, grants, and part-time employment in university or community agencies. Many programs have special arrangements with their campus student affairs division whereby Counseling Psychology students are hired for part-time (or graduate assistantship) positions in the counseling center, career center, women S center, equal opportunity program, housing office, financial aid office, placement center, testing services, residence halls, commuter services, undergraduate advising office, continuing education services, etc. This information should be readily available to all students, preferably in a student handbook.

Counseling Psychology programs are often disadvantaged with respect to teaching assistantships, particularly if they are part of a graduate department only. Some counseling psychology programs have begun offering introductory courses in counseling psychology to undergraduates as a way of generating teaching assistantships for their students. Many universities provide fellowships to support underrepresented ethnic minorities. Counseling Psychology students who qualify should be encouraged to apply for these fellowship. Counseling Psychology faculty should actively push for the establishment of such fellowships on campuses where they are not yet available.

4.1.2 Extramural Resources
Many programs have special arrangements with such off-campus agencies as the local mental health clinic and community social service agencies for hiring counseling psychology students.

DOTs should also be aware of extramural fellowships that are available to students in Counseling Psychology. For example, the American Psychological Association offers stipends to qualified minority graduate students in psychology. The host institution is required to provide matching funds. For more information write to:

Minority Fellowship Program
American Psychological Association
750 First ST. NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
e-mail: [email protected] or website: www.apa.orglmfp

4.2 Teaching Support
4.2.1 Intramural Support
Many Counseling Psychology Programs offer a colloquium series to supplement their regular curriculum. In addition to departmental funds earmarked for this purpose, some universities provide special funds for visiting professors and lecturers whose work touches several disciplines. Counseling psychologists whose work overlaps with psychology, sociology, anthropology, ethnic studies, women's studies, and other areas should be considered for these special appointments.

4.2.2 Extramural Support
The National Institute of Mental Health and the National Science Foundation offer training grants that may be appropriate for Counseling Psychology Programs.

4.3 Research Support
Obtaining money for research has a number of payoffs: (a) providing money to support faculty member's research interests and efforts, (b) providing money for graduate research assistants, and (c) enhancing program and faculty visibility through article publication. DOTs should strongly encourage grant applications, both intramural and extramural.

4.3.1 Intramural Support
Many universities provide seed money to support pilot research in anticipation of its resulting in large extramural grants later. DOTs should encourage their faculty, particularly Assistant Professors, to make use of university research funds for this purpose.

4.3.2 Extramural Support

DOTs should be alert to the various types of research grants available from state and federal agencies as well as private foundations. The Annual Register of Grant Support provides information about both public and private funding sources. The Taft Foundation Report provides information about private funding sources only. Both of these books are usually available in the campus library or office of research development. Specific agencies that often fund research related to counseling psychology include (but are by no means limited to) the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Mental Health, and the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration. The Society for Psychotherapy Research also provides funds for research. In addition, DOTs can be placed on APA's "grant funding" mailing list.